Law Office of Carl A. Secola, Jr., LLC

Medical malpractice, fall leads to loved one's death

No one wants to lose a family member too soon. As a result, they may take them to the hospital when signs of a serious medical condition present themselves. While Connecticut residents may hold their breath as they wait for their loved one to get better, they may find themselves distraught to learn that medical malpractice contributed to their loved one's demise instead.

It was recently reported that a family in another state filed a lawsuit against a hospital for such an outcome. Apparently, a 61-year-old woman had been taken to the hospital for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the family believes that the staff neglected the woman as she developed Stage 4 bedsores and also suffered injuries after falling from her bed.

Less than two weeks after the fall, the woman died. The family believe that the bedsores, injuries from the fall and hospital staff's careless actions contributed to her premature demise. Legal representation for the hospital has denied the claims, and the hospital's director of public affairs did not provide specific comment on the pending litigation.

Medical malpractice is a serious issue and, as this case shows, can cause considerable and even fatal harm to patients. If Connecticut residents have lost loved ones due to the negligent actions of hospital staff members, they may want to explore their available legal options. Filing a lawsuit may allow surviving loved ones to hold complicit parties accountable for their parts in the deaths of their loved ones, which may help them on their quests for closure.

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Verdicts & Settlements

Jura v Denegris / Bicyclist injured in collision with motor vehicle; a New Britain jury awarded the plaintiff $3,091,700.00 Less 10%. for comparative negligence reducing the net verdict to $2,782,530.00. The highest offer made by the defendants prior to the verdict was in $50,000. 00

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