Law Office of Carl A. Secola, Jr., LLC

Hoverboard fire risk may lead to products liability claims

When a product poses a safety risk, consumers need to know about that risk as soon as possible. Additionally, they need to know what type of problem the safety hazard could present and if there is a chance that injuries or other damage could occur. Unfortunately, many products could have defects or other issues that may harm users, and as a result, products liability claims may be warranted.

Connecticut residents may want to reconsider purchasing a self-balancing scooter or hoverboard due to recent recalls. Reports stated that the battery packs in these products pose a risk of overheating, which can cause fires and explosions. The United States Consumer Product Safety Commission issued multiple recalls in relation to these products and the hazards that they pose to users.

Apparently, one of these self-balancing scooters caused a house fire that resulted in substantial damage to the home and four other houses. It was also reported that earlier this year another house fire caused by a hoverboard resulted in the deaths of a two young girls. Various versions of these scooters and hoverboards have been under recall since 2016, and the most recent recalls issued this month pertain to seven other brands.

Parents often consider buying these products for their children, and many adults also enjoy these items for themselves. As a result, anyone of any age could be at risk of suffering injuries due to a fire caused by the overheating battery packs. If Connecticut residents have suffered injuries or lost loved ones due to fires caused by these products or due to other issues with the products, they may wish to look into their options for filing products liability claims.

Source: katu.com, "Commission issues additional hoverboard recalls ahead of holidays", Nov. 15, 2017

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